What Would a Duke Do?

It’s easy for me to identify the type of book I feel like reading on any given day based on how I react to the blurbs of items on my to-read list. After finishing Melinda Gates’s The Moment of Lift, which I recently reviewed, I thought I might be interested in another non-fiction book. That idea belly-flopped quite magnificently when I couldn’t even bring myself to pick a title, let alone read a blurb. SO, I decided a fluffy romance was probably what my brain needed following the weighty material I had just finished. Unfortunately, I fell down a rabbit-hole of entirely uninteresting sounding contemporary romances on my to-read list before I landed on What Would a Duke Do? by Collette Cameron.

The Moment of Lift

If you read our “Books We’re Looking Forward to in 2019” post, you might remember that I was excited about the prospect of reading Melinda Gates’s book. Despite the fact that it’s not my usual type of book, I was interested in reading it because of the blurb and because it was written about some of the work supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation - specifically about the work they do to support women. The title of the book refers to Gates’s primary point: “If you want to lift society up, invest in women.”

The Viscount and the Vixen

I broke down and got a promotional Kindle Unlimited membership, just to try it out. The cool thing about it is that I can read a whole series on Kindle Unlimited without paying for it (with the exception of my monthly membership fee, of course), which means I have been reading a lot more romance series than I used to do. The first romance series I stumbled upon on Kindle Unlimited was The Somerton Scandals series by Ava Devlin.

Player

Those of you who have read my reviews in the past know that I get most of my reading material from emails. I subscribe to several authors’ email newsletters and I get a couple of email lists of books I might be interested in reading. This book came to me - no surprise here - in an email from one of the authors I follow.

The Memory Thief

I came across this Cinderella retelling as an ad on BookBub, one of the lists I get emailed to me periodically. I clicked on it because I wanted a closer look at the cover art. I bought it because of the description. I read the whole series, because I had to find out what happens next. To explain The Memory Thief, I have to set the stage a bit...

Royal

If you know me - or if you’ve read any of my reviews in the past - you read the content notes for this post and thought, “Bethany read this? That doesn’t sound like her style…” You would be correct. The blurb for this book did NOT prepare me for the amount of trauma the characters experience, which is a large part of why I have chosen to review it.

How to Blackmail a Highlander

After the last book that I read - a contemporary military romantic suspense - I wanted a change of pace. I still wanted to read a romance novel; my boyfriend and I have an anniversary approaching and romance is in the air. So, I chose a period romance set in England and the Scottish Highlands.

Securing Caite

Susan Stoker is one of my favorite Romantic Suspense authors. She has that title partially because her books always include some kind of external conflict (unlike many romance novels that rely on interpersonal drama for the conflict) and partially because the first book in all of her series are FREE!

The Only Woman in the Room

When you picture getting an English Literature degree, you probably imagine being nose-deep in books all the time. I took a couple of film classes while obtaining my English Lit degree. Because of the abundance of movies I had to watch for class, I gained an appreciation for black and white films. When I saw a book about Hedy Lamarr, who not only acted in black and white films, but also had a huge impact on communication technology, I was excited.

Vox

Since I read Fahrenheit 451 my freshman year of high school, I have deeply enjoyed reading dystopian literature. The best part is that there is so much dystopian literature out there, I get tired of reading them before I run out of books to read. Most of the dystopian books that I read are “classics” - Bradbury, Huxley, Atwood, etc.- but I recently came across a debut novel with a plot that caught my attention. I’ve never read A Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood, but I’m told that this book is similar in nature - it just has a different twist.